Get More Work! Tutors, Here’s How To Market Yourselves To Students!

Tutors, Market Yourselves To Students

All of us at StudyGate are pleased to work with brilliant people all over the world. You’re professors, students, tutors, writers, and lifelong learners with boundless knowledge that you’re kind enough to share with students. Therefore, we want you to get as much work as you want and we’re going to share ways you can market yourselves to students, so you can do exactly that.

When students post questions on StudyGate, they’re looking for three things: Quality, Credibility, and Care. Basically, they want to know that their tutor can definitely answer their question, knows what they’re talking about, and actually wants to help them. Express these successfully, and students will always come back for more. Here is a question from a student called Angela. Let’s look at a few examples of bids that will show you what and what not to do.

Question: I need someone to help me edit my economics paper.

 

Terrible:

Tutor Reply: I can do your assignment. Accept my offer nw. Yes. I can handle

 

This is a terrible way to attract students. It does not answer the student’s original question, and it tells us nothing about the tutor’s skills and qualifications. Your bid is the first contact you have with a student. The way you message them determines how they see you and whether they decide to trust you. Without any relevant information, this tutor’s message seems a little pushy, and the student will likely ignore it.

 

Okay:

Tutor Reply: Hi, it would be a privilege to review and edit your economics paper, ensuring clarity and fantastic style. Publishing is my life’s work. As a design coordinator at Cornell University, I work with designers, production editors, and copywriters in turning manuscripts into published books. Our  goals are to produce and disseminate excellent scholarship… At your request, I can provide more information about my skills, experience, and qualifications.

 

This reply is fine but has potential. The tutor begins by offering to help and promising a great result. They go into a long career summary before offering to share more about their career–this is where it all goes wrong. Again, students just want to know that you’re interested and can help them. They don’t have time to read a complete career summary, so keep it brief! You can include a couple sentences explaining why you’re qualified but leave it at that. Keep it moving!

 

Great:

Tutor Reply: Hello, I looked at your paper and feel I am a great candidate to help you for two reasons. First, I am a sociologist (Ph.D). While economics is not my primary focus, my dissertation research focused on the pharmaceutical industry which required I gain a basic understanding of the subject. I am attaching my academic resume and dissertation; I am happy to provide other writing samples as needed.

 

This reply is great for two main reasons. First, the tutor shows that they have already seen and understood the student’s assignment. They have taken the initiative to start working on the project before they’ve even been chosen! Nice! Second, they give a brief reason why they’re qualified, attach their resume to back it up, and offer to give more examples if needed. This tutor shows an openness that will put any student at ease. A little wordy, but it works great!

 

Amazing:

Tutor Reply: Hi Angela, there are a few theoretical gaps and shortfalls I’d like to address with you. However, you’re off to a nice start. (This tutor attached a file with feedback)

 

You’re probably thinking, “That’s it?”, and you’re right. It’s a very short message, but it does so many things well! The tutor addresses the student by name—remember to be personable! The message shows that they have seen the paper, read it, and thought of several ways to fix it. The way they wrote it makes the student curious and wanting to reach out for their input, creating a specific demand for their specific skills! Clever, right? The ending is very reassuring to the student and can make them feel confident in their own skills while they seek improvement. This tutor has done in one message what it takes other tutors several sessions to do: proven their worth, taken steps to solve the problem, and established trust and confidence. Bravo!

 

And that’s it! Marketing yourself to potential students doesn’t take much. Be friendly, take initiative to solve their problem, show that you have the answer, show that you care, and keep it as short as you can. Follow these guidelines and students will come back to you time and time again! For more tips and tutoring jobs, visit StudyGate.com!

 

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