Study Habits for College Students: All the Pro Tips You’ll Ever Need

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19 minute read

These study habits for college students can be found in lots of place online, and they’re all organized here for easy access. Consider this your insider’s library for winning at school.

Or maybe just the r/getstudying subreddit after too much Red Bull. Either way, we’re cheering for you this semester. Now let’s get that A!

Here’s a PDF guide to these articles.

Use the table of contents below to navigate:

Homework:

17 Free Homework Help Websites
5 Helpful Tips For Taking Notes
12 Simple Study Tips that Will Boost Your Results
How to Destroy Homework Procrastination Using YouTube
How To (Quickly) Find Credible Sources For Your Research Paper
How to Succeed in School: Five Easy Learning Tips
Study with Me: Study Tubers to Inspire Your Next A

Test Prep:

Exam Preparation: What Are the Best Test Prep Tips?
How to Study for the ACT: 8 Popular Study Habits to Avoid
A Smart Way To Take A Test
Test Preparation Pointers For The Stressed Out Student

Growth and Development:

Best Time Management Tips for College Students
Common Misconceptions Studying Abroad
Effective Study Tips: Teddy Roosevelt’s Guide to Academic Productivity
Four Ways To Stay Motivated And Finish The School Year Strong
How to Avoid Procrastination in College: Helpful Advice for Students
How To Use Procrastination To Your Advantage
A Non-Stressful Way To Choose A Career Path

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A Smart Way To Take A Test

Easy Questions First

Now that you know what your test looks like, it’s time to knock out the easy questions! Go through the test from beginning to end and take care of any questions you can answer correctly in one or two minutes.

Set Up Anything You’re Unsure About

Tricky questions take time. Use it wisely. Go back to the beginning and start doing some of the harder questions. If you’re taking a multiple-choice test, take the time to quickly jot down short definitions or explanations. If you’re solving equations, write out the first couple of steps you’d take to solve them. Then leave it alone and move to the next tricky problem.

Dive Deep, But Come Up For Air

Tackle those questions that give you the most difficulty. Give each of them your undivided attention. Take the time to think and make sure you’re on the right track. Once in a while, though, look up from your test and look at something else. Focus on something else for about 20 to 30 seconds.

One Last Look

When you’ve finished, take a minute or two to review your test and make sure you’ve answered everything to the best of your ability. Then:

  1. Get up
  2. Turn that thing in…
  3. and forget about it.

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Test Preparation Pointers For The Stressed Out Student

Know EXACTLY What You’re Studying

To build good study habits, be fully aware of what will be on the test. Know exactly which book chapters and concepts you will be tested on. You don’t want ANY surprises.

Go Over Your Notes

Review and organize your class notes as soon as the test is announced. Immediately. Your notes should at least give you basic knowledge of the subject you’re being tested on and can help you cut down on study time.

Speak Now!

A lot of students think good study habits for college students means going it alone. They don’t like talking to their professors either because they’re embarrassed, or they’re scared of them, or they don’t want to reveal that they haven’t been paying attention in class. Here the thing:

Your professor WROTE the test, and if you ask nicely, they’ll probably tell you EXACTLY what’s on it.

Take Action!

Everyone has their own way of studying. If you’re a visual learner, consider using a whiteboard or a piece of paper to write out concepts where you can see them (this works wonders for math and science courses). If you learn best by listening, maybe read your notes aloud, record them and listen to them as you go through the day (or you and a friend could record each other’s notes if you don’t like the sound of your own voice).

Take Care

STOP. DOING. ALL. NIGHT. CRAM. SESSIONS. Be nice to yourself for a change. Give yourself enough time to review and GO. TO. BED. Eat breakfast and bring snacks for the day ahead. Better to get help than wear yourself out cramming.

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A Non-Stressful Way To Choose A Career Path

Learn About Yourself

Lots of people find their career paths in their personal hobbies. The things we love to do are often related to what we become later in life.

Meet Your Heroes (And Talk To Them)

Most people were in the same boat as you when they were younger. Talk to everyone, introduce yourself to people you don’t know, and let them know what you’re interested in. A wise man once said: “It’s not about who you know, it’s about who knows you.”

Get Involved

They say you can’t get a job without experience, and you can’t get experience without a job. Once you figure out what you like to do, and you’ve met a few people who can point you in the right direction, it’s time to get to work! Apply for internships in your desired field, ask a professional if you can observe them at work for a day or two, volunteer, or start working on your own projects and post them online!

Study habits for college students studygate
Success = Setting clear goals for yourself and going in relentless pursuit no matter what.

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How To Use Procrastination To Your Advantage

Realize What You’re Doing

It’s okay to admit to yourself that procrastination is happening! Recognize your own behavior and understand what you normally do and how you feel when you’re about to procrastinate. Just because these aren’t good study habits for college students doesn’t mean the end of the world.

Baby Steps

Break down your task into smaller, more manageable parts that you can complete in an hour or less. By doing so, you put less stress on yourself, and you allow yourself to do great work and demonstrate great study habits for college students!

Hold Yourself Accountable

Netflix is tempting. Everything you’ve ever watched or will ever want to watch, all in one place. Don’t fall for it. When you set a goal, ask a friend to check in on you and make sure you actually got it done!

Reward Yourself!

When you reach a new milestone, celebrate! You’re doing great! Enjoy your favorite snack, take a short break with friends, go for a run or walk, or—yes, go ahead and watch an episode of your favorite show. Now that’s a great study habit with a nice reward!

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5 Helpful Tips For Taking Notes

Listen, Listen, Listen

When your chemistry teacher is giving you a clear definition for a word or concept, write it down. When he’s going on and on and ON about that science museum he visited last weekend, maybe you should skip it. Decide for yourself what your notes should include.

Less Is More

Good notes should not be a word-for-word transcript of what happened in class. That strategy won’t build good study habits for college students. Instead, think of note-taking as a way for you to teach yourself new things. Try writing down key words, using headings and bullet points, writing things in your own words, and making your own codes, shorthand, and quick ways of writing things down.

Eat, Sleep, and Breathe It, Rehearse and Reread It

This is probably one of the easiest ways to study. Reread your notes when you get the chance. The best time to do this is directly after class. Take a separate sheet of paper and copy your notes—only this time, fill in any information you remember from the lecture.

Keep Them Organized

Keep your notes in a binder, and organize them in order of when you wrote them.

Have Fun With It

Use the margins of your paper to draw or write down things that come to mind. The goal is to let those thoughts come, recognize them, and then let them go so you can stay focused.

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How to Succeed in School: Five Easy Learning Tips

Busy is lazy. It means you aren’t thinking through your behavior.

Act with thoughtfulness as you choose tasks to engage with. In this way, you will never grow bored. You’ll also have more time for play as time is more easy to manage.

Apply your learning. Because anything less is foolish.

If you let your learning make you smart and stop there, you are a fool. If you let your learning drive you to action, you will get rich. People value other people who take action. Learning should always have a purpose.

Make your yes really count. Don’t use it for the small things.

There are going to be things in school that are considered required. Math class will be one of them. However, most schools have tremendous extracurricular opportunities. The fact is that there are too many for any one person to take on. So make a polite refusal of “no” be your first instinct. And save your “yes” for the things that you really care about.

Strong views, loosely held. Speak confidently, but stay open to reason.

When working in team projects, take the time to think through your position and your work. Then defend the points you believe with a lot of passion and clearly developed thoughts. But if someone disagrees with you, make a point of listening to them. If their logic is better, you should be open to changing your mind.

Ignore the noise. Your biggest heroes are still imperfect.

Life can be bigger than you ever dreamed once you realize that everything around you was created by someone who isn’t any smarter than you are. Don’t worry about what anyone says. Own your future and make some waves.

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How to Destroy Homework Procrastination Using YouTube

Study With Me Study Tuber #1

Anxious about finding some study buddies, Heleen from Brussels posted in May 2015 about creating a place for people to connect and learn together. She wanted to build good study habits for college students, but most importantly she wanted to help herself.

Since Heleen posted the first ever study with me video on June 1st, 2015, thousands of students have joined the movement to create their own videos. Millions of students are following these channels across YouTube.

Study with Me

At Studygate, students are creating micro Study With Me sessions with their classmates. Too often, you know what you need to do but just can’t take the first step. Study with me sessions builds good study habits for college students and gives you a place to feel connected with your classmates.

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Study with Me: Study Tubers to Inspire your Next A

Why Study with Me?

There are some great reasons to watch these YouTube videos:

  1. Friendship with tons of comments from likeminded students
  2. Community of people committed to learning with you to the next A
  3. Single screen to focus on instead of distracted browsing everywhere

The following are some of the hippest students on the planet with excellent skills at promoting good study habits for college students, presented in no particular order. Each offer their own flavor and personality to compliment your study session.

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Exam Preparation: What Are the Best Test Prep Tips?

Test Prep Tip 1: Plan, Don’t Cram

Create a study guide template to fill over the course of the unit or semester, or make flashcards with important vocabulary words. Writing down or typing what you need to know is a great tool to help you remember key ideas, and when you do it over a longer period of time, you have more opportunities to ask questions if you don’t understand something.

Test Prep Tip 2: Get Together with Friends

Planning a study group with your classmates is a great way to go over material in a relaxed and low-pressure setting. Friends can help to quiz you on important points and help you fill in the blanks for any concepts you may not have been too clear on. Or you can just study with them in peace and quiet. All of these are great study habits for college students.

Study With Your Friends Now

Test Prep Tip 3: Rest, Relax, Rehydrate

By the time the night before a test rolls around, you should only need to briefly look over your notes for five or ten minutes. Anything more is likely to stress you out instead of helping you. Instead, make sure you relax and get plenty of sleep the night before. Remind yourself that you’ve studied hard and done all you can to prepare.

Study habits for college students studygate
If you’re ready for the exam, you can take time to hike for fun too. Wooooooooooooooooooo!

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Common Misconceptions Studying Abroad

Safe Spaces Theory

In September 2015, Greg Lukianoff and Jonathan Haidt released their groundbreaking essay “The Coddling of the American Mind.” The authors describe a safe space as a location where “young adults are shielded from words and ideas that make some uncomfortable.” But safe spaces don’t make good study habits for college students.

We can’t get better without some discomfort.

Safe Spaces Abroad

But I don’t see safe spaces happening in other parts of the world, at least not in Europe. Learning moves in the spirit of Quincy Jones.

You’re supposed to use everything from the past. If you know where you come from, it’s easier to get where you’re going.

How to Thrive When Living Abroad

  1. Acknowledge everyone you meet. From the grocery cashier to your neighbors and classmates. You will need friends, and you will have only one chance to make a first impression. Make it positive by smiling and speaking their language even if you aren’t fluent yet.
  2. Be a chameleon. Chances are you will stick out like a sore thumb, so figure out how other people dress and adapt accordingly. Live like your surroundings and embrace the extraordinary exposure to the unsafe space.
  3. Use learning services to stay grounded in the details of your learning and embrace good study habits for college students regardless of location. You can easily find a tutor to learn with and stay accountable in your local commitments.

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Four Ways To Stay Motivated And Finish The School Year Strong

Organize and Prioritize

If there was ever a time to stay organized, this is it. With so much going on in school and at home, it’s important to keep every date, every obligation, and every meeting straight in your head.

Be Mindful

Study habits for college students start with taking time to slow down and understand what you’re working on. Ask for help if you can’t meet a deadline, focus on delivering quality work, and above all, set aside some time to take care of your health.

Get Some Perspective

The tests you take during this important season can improve or hurt your chances of ending up with that A you’ve been working so hard for, or the high SAT or AP score that will take you to the college of your dreams. It’s a crucial moment! But that’s all it is. A single moment in the vast timeline that is your life.

Remember Your Goals

What did you set out to achieve? Make those goals more visible in your everyday life. Write them on post-it notes and stick it in your notebook, on your refrigerator, on your bathroom mirror, EVERYWHERE. With summer around the corner, it’s very easy to get distracted with all the fun things going on, but that doesn’t give you an excuse to stop short of the finish line.

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We know you’re ready for a break, buckle down just a little longer and you’ll make it!

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How To (Quickly) Find Credible Sources For Your Research Paper

Step One: Take A Position!

For the best study habits for college students, you’ve got to know what you want to say in your paper. Take some time to read the assignment, understand the expectations, and develop an opinion on the subject.

Step Two: Find A…Book? At The…Library?

You can find the most credible sources of knowledge in actual books! Imagine that! Decide what your answer is, then take an hour or two to look for a few library books about your subject. Look through them and pay special attention to certain sections that can help support your main point.

Step Three: Find Some Journals

Next, you’ll want to search for some academic journals. Some of the best academic journal databases are EBSCOHost, JSTOR, and Google Scholar, but there are so many others, so experiment and find out which one you like best. Using your library login info as much as possible will be a great study habit since your college or university will have a subscription to most paid databases.

Step Four: Yeah Alright, Now You Can Run To The Internet

At this point, you couldn’t get more specific if you tried. Now, it’s all about proving your point. Look for quality sources on the internet. You’ll be looking for quick statistics, helpful numbers, and short quotes that you can sprinkle into your paper.

Step Five: Trim The Fat

Now start cutting the stuff you don’t need. If you don’t know how to cite, you can visit the OWL Purdue website to brush up on all the different styles.

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Best Time Management Tips for College Students

Time Management Tip 1: Prioritize

As a college student, your number one priority should always be your academics since college is not free. Good study habits for college students start with taking time to complete your homework fully as soon as you get it and writing out notes gradually as the semester goes on.

Time Management Tip 2: Remember That You’re not a Robot

You’re not a machine wired to churn out study guides for hours a day without rest; you have to give yourself room to develop every side of you. You’ll often find that you’ll learn as much as you do from the library from getting outside of your comfort zone and growing as a person.

Time Management Tip 3: Forgive Yourself

If you’ve studied for hours every night this week, get some extra Z’s and sleep on Saturday morning. If soccer practice has worn your body out this season, take a day or two off to be lazy and eat some junk food. There’s an exception to every rule, so don’t beat yourself up for straying from the path once in a blue moon. Resting and relaxation can be the best study habits for college students. 

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Effective Study Tips: Teddy Roosevelt’s Guide to Academic Productivity

Study on a fixed-time schedule.

His personal diaries and letters show that he would block out time during each day for certain intellectual tasks.

Work only on high-priority tasks.

Do not obsess about next week’s term paper when the algebra test is tomorrow morning. Recognize that some priorities must be realized first. Others can wait.

Focus on one task at hand.

Because you are working within the parameters of a fragmented time schedule, it is imperative that you focus all of your effort and energy on your work. Give it all of your mental energy now, and remain in the moment through the duration of this time period.

Set a specific goal, or solve a problem.

Determine a goal, whether this is solving a problem, writing a certain number of words, or reading a number of chapters. Setting a specific short-term goal will motivate you and allow for a sense of accomplishment.

Create a deadline for “Roosevelt Dashes”

The idea is to exert your mental faculties to the max in short intervals. This will help you get the best study habits for college students. Set a timer where you can see it and push yourself to finish your established task within that time frame. This will take some practice. Stick with a set time period to accomplish your goal and meter yourself to the minute.

Read with a Purpose

Roosevelt read five books a week during his term in the White House. He did this by training his mind to identify the important aspects of the literature instead of getting bogged down in words and details.

Take Time for Personal Growth

Realize that you are not a robot. We all live full and busy lives. We need time for friends and loved ones. Countless obligations will compete for your attention. Yet it is important to set aside time to nourish your soul.

Diversify your Interests

Roosevelt entered Harvard wanting to become an “outdoor naturalist and observer of nature.” His career turned to the business of politics. He had a curious mind and treated everything he did with utmost enthusiasm and passion.

Make Learning a Life Habit

Cultivate a passion for learning and work to constantly expand your mind. Great study habits for college students start with recognizing the big picture is more than a collection of short-term tasks. Maintain a love for intellectual growth and personal development. This will serve to carry you through the inevitable minor frustrations that arise along the way.

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How to Study for the ACT: 8 Popular Study Habits to Avoid

Study Habits to Avoid #1: Pulling an All-nighter/Cramming

Let’s start with the obvious. Sleep deprivation, no matter your age or circumstance, is never a good thing. Instead, take some time to review your notes, and then put them aside well before you go to bed. Relax and get a good night’s sleep.

Study Habits to Avoid #2: Studying with friends.

Unless you’re in a completely structured and disciplined peer group that is working together toward a common goal, like the completion of a project, studying for exams with friends isn’t a good idea. Distractions will happen, and you’ll lose time and productivity.

Study Habits to Avoid #3: Listening to music

Listening to your playlists or other favorite music, especially loudly, is counter-productive. In order to maximize your efficiency, study in a quiet environment.

Study Habits to Avoid #4: Looking at the answers to the sample questions first

Reading the answers before you attempt the question does you no favors. Instead, read the question first and attempt to answer it, THEN read the answer.

Study Habits to Avoid #5: Over-caffeinating prior to the exam

Ingesting too much caffeine can make you jittery, unfocused, and can lead to a major crash in your energy well before you’re finished with the exam.

Study Habits to Avoid #6: Re-writing All of Your Notes

Some people believe that typing or writing out all of their study notes will help their recall. Not true. Once you’ve been through the practice exams, make index card notes on any questions that you really get stuck on, with the questions on one side, and the answers on the other.

Study Habits to Avoid #7: Multi-tasking

It’s not just listening to music that can distract from your studying. Unless you are one of a very small percentage of the world’s population (i.e., 2%), you are not a good multi-tasker. So put down the phone, shut down your browser and turn off the TV.

Study Habits to Avoid #8: Studying for long periods of time

Studying for the ACT takes up a lot of energy, so trying to study for long blocks with no breaks can actually be detrimental. Focused studying for shorter periods of time, and taking periodic breaks to focus on something else, can help you maintain a consistent level of focus and energy.

Study tips for college students studygate
When possible, we recommend dabbing during your study break.

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How to Avoid Procrastination in College: Helpful Study Habits for College Students

  • When you have a task with a deadline, look at the deadline and work backwards to create a schedule.
  • If you can work in a group, do so. Establish accountability for each member of the group and make sure they know their responsibilities.
  • Contact your professor/supervisor for clarification or with any other questions early in the process.
  • Create a schedule that you need to adhere to.
  • Break the big project down into small tasks.
  • Don’t think “I can’t”, think “How can I?”

The best study habits for college students are not always easy to maintain. So if procrastination got the best of your schedule, StudyGate can help with that.

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Deuces, OK!?: Common misconceptions about study tubers

study tubers

Old school learning

Well before the establishment of study tubers and YouTube, 14 UK parents and teachers established the Campaign for Real Education in 1987. Unaffiliated with any political party, the CRE manifesto focuses on freedom for teachers to teach as they choose without having to conform to a specific curriculum.

Competition trumps cooperation. Product comes before process. Overall, the group would prefer to resist the creation of the “politically correct, secular, socialist society” promoted by progressive educators.

It is within this context that CRE chairman Chris McGovern seeks to limit the freedom of students to define how they learn. Seems he prefers to leave the methodology to the experts.

Chuckin up the deuces, study tubers entered the Internet in 2015 and took matters into their own hands.

What are study tubers?

These channels consist of current and former students building learning community on YouTube through subscriptions and comments on their videos. Video discussion threads become a source of inspiration and encouragement.

Discussion comments from study with me (cramming w coffee)

Students share videos of themselves studying or explain best tips for getting As on exams in order to satisfy expectations. Sometimes they simply share their successes and failures when receiving acceptance letters from their favorite Ivy League school. The study with me videos turn into a source of accountability and celebration for keeping students focused on the task at hand.

I wanted to find out why students would make study with me videos in the first place. These unique videos consist of nothing but setting a camera on the student while they study.

So I reached out to study tuber Melissa Brady

Brady runs a no-holds-barred channel that emphasizes keeping it real at all times. Her videos are a perfect example of an anti-fake aesthetic that so many teenagers care about today. The consumer culture filled with offers and promotions takes a background role. Brady replaces it with content showing we are all caught in the machine.

This aesthetic shines through in her highly concentrated 1-second clips of daily living. Subscribers watch her taking out the retainer, brushing teeth, getting coffee, making shakes, and waiting in lines.

Gone is the notion of pretending beauty and perfection are a part of who we are. Instead, Brady and other study tubers call the product what it is. Makeup is unreal. Good grades are a grind. Brady separates herself from the end result and takes her users through the transformative process it takes to get there:

The reason why I chose to post videos of me studying is because I wanted to motivate my subscribers AS WELL as me. When I film myself studying I know that there are going to be a lot of other people studying along with my video and it makes me very excited to study and film. I especially wanted my studying series to be more of something “fun” to do instead of something that you have to do.

study with me (cramming w coffee)
study with me (cramming w coffee) (click here for overview, scroll down to #11)

What educators think about study tubers

The study tuber movement doesn’t impress everyone. CRE chairperson Chris McGovern quipped in the the Telegraph earlier this year that “we need to get away from the videos, I suspect they are whipping up hysteria. Unfortunately for youngsters, they tend to whip each other up into a frenzy.” Reader Alex Ford commented that “Watching Youtube instead of studying is the new tidying your desk.”

But is study tubing really a waste of time?

Career educators like high school teacher Patty Wilcox of Larned, Kans., take a more nuanced view on the popularity of study tubers: “[student viewers] need to realize they are not that person and need to adapt the information to their own personality style and ability. . . . I believe in utilizing tools that tap into my students’ world. Many of them are watching videos anyway, why not use that medium to our advantage?”

Students that would dare to take ownership of their own learning deserve empowerment, not criticism. Studying for good grades to get in the ideal school is stressful enough already. If I’m going to pursue that, the best practice is to surround myself with friends helping me along the way.

If others couldn’t get that, it might be time to give them the deuces and find your own study solutions.

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Don’t cheat but if you do know the one thing that really matters

Cheating hand

It might not seem obvious at first, but Mark Twain was a firm advocate of cheating. He suggested that “it is good to obey all the rules when you’re young, so you’ll have the strength to break them when you’re old.”

Mark Twain wouldn’t like the idea of cheating while you’re young, but he also lived in a world where the age of adulthood was 10 or 12. So maybe you’re already old enough to break the rules, at least by 19th century standards.

The difficulties humans cannot process or describe are projected onto future generations, rinse and repeat.

Having thrived in spite of his bad business chops, the wisdom of Twain still resonates today. Children still have to meet parent expectations. Teachers are still severe. Each generation passes the pain it experienced to the next one out of annoyance for the lack of love received, incessant “no you can’t do that” messages we heard as children, and desire to get ahead. The difficulties humans cannot process or describe are projected onto future generations, rinse and repeat.

No wonder a student would seek how to cheat to get ahead. All these adults berating and telling students to follow the rules — the process is exhausting. If you follow Twain’s advice, you simply conform as a teenager, but what if there are other options? Educational data analyst Zachary Goldman has documented the fact that students will often explore other options and break the rules to achieve a higher goal:

1. Get that diploma

2. Not embarrass your parents

3. Never deal with that professor again

These justifications sound like something inspired by Machiavelli. The 16th century Italian diplomat would judge actions by their ultimate outcomes instead of the questionable action itself, but YouTuber Thomas Frank posts that laziness is the biggest threat to making new habits—even getting beyond cheating. The reality is that discovering how to cheat allows us to get ahead in the short term with the option to focus on activities that are easy and feel good. Which makes cheating a pretty tempting option.

So if you know how to cheat already or are thinking about it, sit down and ask yourself, “What is the bigger yes I have to achieve by cheating on this course right now?” I’m here to suggest that “easy” and “feel good” are not good enough reasons to cheat. But if the grade is really the most important thing, don’t have illusions that you care about learning in school. Admit to yourself that you don’t care, define your bigger “yes” to follow and dig into that.

My desk of bigger yeses to achieve—Learn Mandarin and understand teaching

In a Google world built to make information “universally accessible and useful,” there are inevitable answer-finding tools in a 21st century knowledge economy. The pandora’s box of answer access is open, and teachers and parents should accept that there is no going back.

What is your biggest fear? Conformance to something you halfway believe in or the dangers associated with making your own path?

No age is too young to think for yourself. If we constantly jump through hoops to meet the expectations of our parents and teachers, we risk conforming to a system of herd morality. Friedrich Nietzsche hated this trend where people valued things that didn’t really matter instead of trying to become great at something. People were coming up with euphemisms to justify cowardly behavior like calling impotence “goodness of heart” and describing submission as “obedience.” Nobody wants to become a pawn in a system.

If you cheat, know the costs. Getting caught makes it hard to advance in school, hurts your reputation with educators, and might get you kicked out. But the cost of following school rules can be just as damaging. What if you conform and end up sucking at life in a part-time job running the rat race with a premium UltraHD Netflix subscription? Now is the time to ask yourself, “What is your biggest fear? Conformance to something you halfway believe in or the dangers associated with making your own path?”

So if you know how to cheat already, own it. If learning about World War II and trigonometry isn’t good enough for you, then find something better to learn. Cheat with the knowledge of the one thing that really matters. If you’re going to do the bare minimum, identify the place where you will give your maximum. Leverage your desire to get a good grade with a greater need to do something specific with your time. Just make Twain proud and know the rules before you start breaking them.

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Four Ways To Stay Motivated And Finish The School Year Strong

Stay Motivated

It’s May! That means state testing, prom, research projects, just a bit more homework than you bargained for, and a whole bunch of other things that can really take a toll on your focus. It’s easy to start slacking right around this time of year. The end of the school year is in sight, summer’s on the way, the weather’s nicer, everything seems more upbeat and relaxed. But you’ve got to stay motivated!

Don’t fall for it!

There’s a lot you can do to sabotage yourself in this critical time in the academic year. It’s okay to stop and smell the roses every now and then, but you’ve also got to stand up straight, square your shoulders, and put in the work. Here are four ways to help you do that:

Organize and Prioritize

If there was ever a time to stay organized, this is it. With so much going on in school and at home, it’s important to keep every date, every obligation, every meeting straight in your head. If you don’t already, keep a planner handy to write down things that you know you need to take care of in the future. Then, rank those things from most to least important. Now,  you can direct your attention to the things that need it the most, and you’ll feel less stressed as a result!

Be Mindful

Speaking of stress, it’s easy to get overwhelmed with everything that’s going on around you. In the midst of all the chaos, take time to slow down and understand what you’re working on. Group projects and research assignments pile up during this time of year, so it’s a good idea to be especially aware of your work habits and how you’re feeling. When choosing how to divide your time, be selective! Ask for help if you can’t meet a deadline, focus on delivering quality work, and above all, set aside some time to take care of your health.

Get Some Perspective

The tests you take during this important season can improve or hurt your chances of ending up with that A you’ve been working so hard for, or the high SAT or AP score that will take you to the college of your dreams. It’s a crucial moment! But that’s all it is. A single moment in the vast timeline that is your life. Don’t put any unnecessary stress on yourself. One test does not decide what your entire future will be. Chin up, shoulders back, do your very best, and your future will fall into place, you’ll see!

Remember Your Goals

There are so many contradictory things about May. It’s testing season, and you should study hard, but prom is coming up, and you want to party hard. Graduation is coming up, and you feel like you’re finished, but those last few assignments count—it’s not over yet! Take time to remember your goals. What did you set out to achieve? Make them more visible in your everyday life. Write them on post-it notes and stick it in your notebook, on your refrigerator, on your bathroom mirror, EVERYWHERE. With summer around the corner, it’s very easy to get distracted with all the fun things going on, but that doesn’t give you an excuse to stop short of the finish line.

 

Students, this is time to remain focused and do all you can to finish the school year strong! Keep yourself accountable, check your urges to slack off, and accomplish what you set out to do! For more helpful tips, homework help, test preparation, and one-on-one tutoring, visit us at StudyGate.com!

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Fighting The System: Good Students Vs. Academic Dishonesty

Academic Honesty

Students are blurring the lines between academic honesty and legitimate study more and more as time goes on. While the nature of cheating is still clearly defined, students can now find help online in a multitude of ways. It can be difficult to determine what is dishonest and what isn’t.

For example, is it cheating if a tutor works out a math related homework problem for a student to study later? The student did not technically do the work, but the student does not turn it is as his or her own work. The distinction is becoming more and more unclear.

As students go further in their academic careers, there is a greater urge to be academically dishonest. The students who have cheated in the past will continue to do so. But what about everyone else? What about the students who normally perform well, but find the need to find extra help elsewhere? There are many reasons why students cheat, but the most consequential reasons come from the fact that students in higher education are often pitted against an unforgiving system that gives very few second chances.

 

Numbers Matter

Many rigorous college courses weigh some assignments more heavily than others. It’s very common for a teacher to instruct a course in which there are two important assignments—a midterm and a final, or a final and a research project. The homework has little, if any, influence on the final grade. Students understand that they’ve got to learn strategy if they want to succeed in higher education. It’s not enough to just show up, listen, and do the assignments. You’ve got to know how to work the numbers and figure out what hits you can and cannot afford to take. If both your tests are each 40% of your final grade, and you don’t do so well on the first one, you know you’re performing damage control for the rest of the semester. This is part of the problem. Students will do anything to boost or stabilize that grade percentage. Sometimes, they run into situations that are less about ethics and more about survival.

 

Full Speed Ahead

The pace of the course is also a contributing factor to why students cheat. You’ve got to be absolutely ready for a midterm in a ten-week course because, again, doing poorly will cost you for the rest of the term. It’s one thing to have difficulty learning at such a rapid pace. Being penalized for it is another matter entirely! Yes, that’s just part of the challenges students face in higher education and they should learn to adjust. But the breakneck pace leads to a lot of anxiety among students who have a lot depending on the outcome of a course. A low or average grade could cause a student to miss out on an internship, university admission, or scholarship. The challenge itself is not what causes academic dishonesty. The outcome and subsequent effect on a student’s life is enough for even the most ethical student to weigh their options more closely.

 

Learning Factory

Many universities around the country offer courses with an enrollment size of 100 or more students total. Professors often do not have time to get to know each student individually, much less learn their handwriting, work ethic, and learning style. Academic dishonesty becomes much more attractive knowing that the instructor may not know that the student is cheating in the first place. It’s much harder to do in community colleges or schools with smaller class sizes, but is relatively easy in larger university courses.

 

So What’s The Takeaway?

I don’t believe new technology has any influence over a student’s decision to cheat. The way we cheat today is the same way we’ve cheated 30 years ago, those methods have just moved to an online format. However, today’s students are aware that they have to understand the system they’re engaged in if they want to survive. Every course syllabus explains the weight of various assignments. The student decides what to focus on. If they slip up on a certain assignment, or perform poorly on a test, they understand that it’s not enough just to do well on the next one. Academic dishonesty isn’t necessarily a route for lazy students to avoid applying themselves. It’s also a way for students to stack the odds in their favor. If we want to address the growing threat of academic dishonesty, we first need to understand the situation students all over the country contend with. It’s so much more than just studying and taking tests. It’s strategy, too.

 

For homework help, one-on-one tutoring, and more articles like these, visit StudyGate.com!

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Four Reasons Why Vocational Classes Will Make AP Students Successful

AP Students

Harvard president Charles Eliot expresses how difficult it is to provide an  education that leaves students prepared for the workforce in his 1869 article, The New Education. On one hand, he champions trade schools. He cites their usefulness in producing effective workers with a strong sense of practicality. On the other hand, he recognizes the need to develop the American educational system to cultivate strong thinkers and educators. His difficulty in finding a comprehensive education presented a problem that still exists today.

About forty years ago, lifestyle courses such as home economics and wood shop were serious elective classes. They taught important skill sets for everyday life. As schools slightly shifted their focus to boosting academic test scores, these classes have taken a backseat and gained a reputation for being “easy A” courses. They are basically where unmotivated students can gain extra credits toward graduation.

In recent years, however, schools like Tesla STEM High School in Redmond, Washington are starting to combine Advanced Placement courses with vocational classes to provide much needed hands-on experience and better prepare students for life after high school, according to a recent PBS article. It’s a move that could potentially lead us to emphasize that pragmatism and scholarship go hand in hand. Here are a few reasons why this improvement is a step toward Eliot’s vision that will give students the tools to be more productive and successful in the future.

 

Practice Over Theory

Typically, high schools separate hands-on experiences from textbook learning as students get older. Yes, many courses incorporate effective learning exercises into their curriculum, but at the end of the day, there is a greater emphasis on standardized testing and sprucing up that all-important college transcript. Students mostly apply their knowledge to hypothetical situations. While this may do wonders for test scores, abstract theories do not completely prepare students for the future. In short, students learn by doing things. The more things they do, the more they think about their skills and work they want to pursue in the future.

 

Practical Skills Are Essential For Survival

Home economics, wood shop, auto repair, and other vocational courses teach valuable skills that adults use every day. While it is important to learn advanced science and math concepts, learning to cook a complete meal is equally important. Students need to learn basic survival skills, such as how to change a tire, change oil, sewing, tax preparation, and so much more. As students transition into college life, these skills will give them a sense of independence.

 

More Application, Less Memorization

In most AP courses, students rapidly move through difficult concepts and lessons throughout the year, taking tests regularly. Then, over the months of March and April, students and teachers shift into test preparation mode. They study the AP test format, nailing down all the definitions and possible questions and preparing students for the big test in May. These courses are useful for teaching students advanced concepts and how to take on challenges, but they are ultimately test centered. The knowledge gained is quickly lost. Students at Tesla STEM High School agree that applying knowledge to real-world situations helps them understand the material. One student links behavioral sciences to a career in forensics, saying that, “The lab work really puts things in perspective and makes them easier to understand when we take tests.”

 

Mixing Students Of Different Academic Levels Could Be Beneficial

In our current academic culture, the gifted and talented students are slowly separated from everyone else. In high school, there is a clear distinction. Mixing students of various skill has the potential to increase learning by removing status as a factor in academic success. The students normally suited to AP courses can apply their knowledge with other students and learn to become problem solvers. They learn how to work in a team of people with different backgrounds and skill sets. Students who lack the skills to succeed in college and beyond would face greater challenges and demand excellence from themselves. A learning environment plays a significant role in a student’s success and there is a lot that they can do to support each other.

 

 

A man cannot run an organization or company without having first performed the organization’s basic services, according to Eliot. A doctor cannot become the head of a major medical institution without having spent time with actual patients. The same concept applies here. Students will be better off if they apply their advanced lessons to real situations. Knowledge coupled with experience yields longer lasting success, and it is time that our educational system reflected this principle.

For more articles about education, homework help, study tips, and one-on-one tutoring, visit StudyGate.com!

 

 

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StudyMate: Smart And Secure Strategies To Survive The SAT Showdown (Part 2)

SAT Survival Strategies

“If ignorant both of your enemy and yourself, you are certain to be in peril.” -Sun Tzu, The Art of War

 

It’s 6:30AM. You’ve had a good night’s sleep, ate a good breakfast, and you’re about to make your way to the test location for the big showdown. This is what you’ve been preparing for all these months. Now it’s time to put that training to the test.

But wait!

This is the real thing! This is where it counts! Even with all that preparation, you’ll need to walk in with a winning strategy if you truly want to do your best. Listen up, solider! Here are some things you can do to stay confident in the fog of war and emerge victorious!

 

Roll Call!

Before you leave, double check to make sure you’ve got all your important stuff. Make sure you’ve got your calculator, your pencils, erasers, snacks, and ESPECIALLY your watch. You can’t afford to leave a single thing behind. While you’re at it, make sure you’re carrying your I.D. and any test registration materials!

 

Set Up Your Station

As soon as you find your desk, lay out everything you need. Take out an eraser and an extra pencil, and keep everything else tucked away under your seat. You don’t know how tiny your work space is going to be, so make the most of it and minimize any distractions.

 

You vs. Time

When your test administrator has gone over all the rules and you’re allowed to begin, take a look at the top of the section you’re about to start. There is usually a suggested time limit printed at the top, and you should set a pace to work within these confines.

Remember that watch we told you about earlier? This is where it comes in handy (sorry).

Having the time right next to you all the time will help you stay focused on your test. If you have to crane your neck to look at the clock alllllllllll the way across the room (and see all the other anxious students working on their tests), it’s going to mess up your flow. You’ll never wonder how much time you have left because you can check it periodically and adjust your pace as you go!

 

Sacrifices Must Be Made

While taking your SAT practice tests, you tried to simulate the real test conditions as closely as you could, but you couldn’t help taking time to answer each question to the best of your knowledge. And that’s great!

But this is war.

And in war, you’ve got to count the cost of your actions.

If you come across a question that you cannot answer in a reasonable amount of time, or has you stuck between two or three answers, don’t hesitate to skip it. It may feel like you’re losing out on valuable points, but an unanswered question hurts less than a wrong one, and more correct answers are going to earn you a better score!

I understand you didn’t want to leave that question behind, son. I know you could have saved it.

But it ain’t worth it, soldier. Move on.

 

Refuel

There will be a designated time to use the bathroom and take a short break. This is when you have your snacks! Yes, you’ll probably be hungry anyway, but OUR reason for bringing snacks is for morale. If you bring a snack you love, it’ll make you happier and put you back in a positive mood after a couple hours of testing. Then, go back in there in finish it off!

 

Live To Fight Another Day (Unless You’re Happy With The Result)

When you’ve handed in your test and have run far, far away from it, remember that you did your best, and that’s what counts. Also remember that you can take the SAT as many times as you want to improve your score. Many people take it two or three times! Get your results when they’re released and take the time to figure out where you excelled and where you could use improvement. Add these things to your strategy for next time, and increase your chances of scoring higher!

 

 

And that’s it! Keep yourself motivated, remember your training, stick to your test taking strategy, and we guarantee you’ll be successful! It’s all about keeping your cool, managing your time wisely and keeping yourself motivated. Once you understand that, half the battle is already won! For more helpful SAT tips and homework help, visit StudyGate.com! Dismissed!

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Do You Hate Group Projects? Here’s Five Steps To A Better Experience!

Group Projects

Group Projects. Nobody really likes them, but we all have to do them at some point. Naturally, working with a group of strangers comes with its problems, but they don’t go away once you graduate! You’ve got to master this! You’ll have to do a lot of it in the workplace. Here is a list of things you can do to make the group project experience less painful and more productive!

 

Say Something, And Say It Quick

You’ll be allowed to choose your own groups if you’re lucky. In that case, great! If you don’t, you’ve got some socializing to do. There’s usually an awkward moment in class when you’ve got to sit with your group while your teacher explains your assignment. Take that opportunity to introduce yourself! Learn your partner’s names and be friendly! You’ll come off as a team player and someone fun to work with, rather than That-One-Guy-Or-Girl-In-My-Group-That-I-Don’t-Really-Know.

 

Find The Alpha, Be The Alpha

There’s always that one person, or couple of people, that assumes responsibility and takes control of the group right from the start.

You know who I’m talking about.

They’re the one that comes up with the ideas, coordinates meeting times, introduces themselves to everyone (ahem), and is heavily involved all the way through. Find that person. Stick with them, learn with them, offer your own ideas, approach the group together. Cooperating with proactive people is a great way to learn how to work with others. Every ship needs a captain, why can’t it be you?

 

Listen Up

When your group meets to work on your assignment, a lot of ideas will be passed around. As a member of that group, it’s your responsibility to listen to those ideas, discuss them with the other members, and decide as a group if you’d like to include them. The trick here is to keep an open mind. Everyone probably has an idea of what they want the final product to look like. What you’re being tested on is your ability to take all those ideas and combine them into something you all can be proud of. Discuss all of your ideas early, get on the same page, decide on a direction, and move together as one!

 

Pull Your Weight

This is every student’s nightmare: You’re stuck with a bunch of slackers who don’t care about their own grades, much less yours. They sit around and mindlessly agree with everyone’s opinions at every group meeting, they don’t work on a single thing, and then they show up to the presentation and take the credit. You better believe it’s happening RIGHT NOW. Don’t be that person. Do your part of the assignment, and give it your best shot. If you suspect anyone in your group of being lazy, offer to help with their portion of the work. Best case scenario? They’ll accept and you can work together to create a stronger project, or at least they’ll get the hint and start picking up the slack.

 

 

Group Projects

Take Pride

At the end of your project, your teacher will likely have all of you present your work. As you speak to the class, be sure to give credit to your fellow group members for their individual ideas. If there was a member who made a particularly great point, or did an important part of the project, let everyone know! It will give your fellow group member a little more confidence, inspire them to give it back to you, and show everyone that your group is united!

 

You see? Group projects don’t have to be so bad! It’s all about getting out of your own space and learning how to be interactive, insightful, and friendly toward your peers. Try it out the next time you’re given a group project! For more helpful advice, study tips, and homework help, visit StudyGate.com!

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The Art Of Focus

The Art of Focus

During the last year of my undergrad studies, I found it hard to focus.

I was finally approaching the end of a five-year journey that took me across countless classes in multiple cities, two community colleges, and (at last) one university, and I was DONE. We’re now in the middle of March, and for many of you, the work is piling up and you might feel the same way! You’re tired, you’re hungry, you didn’t get enough sleep last night, and you just want to finish that assignment you’ve been working on for hours. Even though concentrating can get harder as you get busier, don’t fret! There are ways you can get back on track, energized, and ready to take on any challenge. Those methods are part of what I like to call The Art of Focus.

 

Do Something Else

When you’ve been studying for hours, all those textbooks and homework assignments just start to blend together. Give yourself a break, go do something else! The trick is, it has to be something a little complex that makes you think—just in a different way! During midterm season, I liked to spread a puzzle (500 to 1000 pieces, please!) on a table in my room, and I would take a break and work on it every once in a while. It helped me regain my focus because I was using my right brain, the creative side, and giving my left brain, the analytical side, a rest. This is much better than, say, watching TV because it keeps your brain engaged in a different way so you’re ready to pick up where you left off!

 

Do Something Nice

Whenever I felt especially overwhelmed by my studies, I dropped everything I was doing and looked for someone that I could help. It could be someone redecorating their room, moving heavy items, fixing something, or even someone who’s also studying, too! Not only does helping others feel good, it completely takes your mind off your own studies for a while. When you get back to your work, you’ll realize you haven’t thought about it in a while (that’s the idea) and you’ll be able to approach it with a fresh mind.

 

The Art of Focus

Do Something Creative

Do you like to draw? Paint? Write stories? Do you have a fun hobby? Take some time away from your studies to pursue something fun and creative that will allow you to relieve stress! In my undergrad career, I loved playing video games as a study break (particularly fighting games) because I could shift my focus to a different short-term goal, which left me energized when I got back to my homework. Another great thing to try is to simply lie somewhere comfortable, listen to music, and just stare into space. Make a playlist of your most relaxing songs, find a good spot, and clear your mind. Just be careful not to fall asleep!

 

Get Active (Physically And Verbally)

My environment was one of the reasons why I found it hard to concentrate during a long study session. Basically, I shut myself away in a dimly lit room and surrounded myself with piles of papers, books, notes, and clutter for hours at a time. Set yourself free by going…

say it with me…

outside!

If you’re aiming to complete a two-hour study session, take a couple of short 15-minute breaks and go outside (if it’s daytime) or just go walking through your home. Speak to the people you live with, call your friends for a quick chat, talk to your friend’s dog if you have to. Just make sure you’re moving your body and interacting with other people. Studying is often solitary, but it doesn’t have to be lonely!

All of these things are going to take a while to adjust to as you learn what works best for you. Here’s the point: Work and rest go hand-in-hand. You can’t work constantly, despite other’s (and our own) expectations. You regain focus in times of rest. Take advantage of the many ways you can do that, and you’ll develop razor sharp focus in no time! For more helpful tips, homework help, and online tutoring, visit StudyGate.com!

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StudyMate: How To (Quickly) Find Credible Sources For Your Research Paper

Research. Finding credible sources.  The most terrifying words you’ll hear in your entire academic career. Just hearing them made me go into denial:

 

“What? What do you mean I have to form an opinion? Wait, wait, you mean I can’t just say whatever I feel like? I have to look for…facts and evidence?”

 

Yes. You’ve got to do all that, and I know it can be a lot of work. It doesn’t have to be so terrible, though! Good research is systematic. It follows a certain logic as you develop what you want to say. You might be dreading all that time you’ll spend combing through textbooks and clickin’ around the internet, but if you follow what I’m about to tell you…

…and really focus…

…you can finish your research in a day. In. A. Day.

Look!

 

Step One: Take A Position!

Before you even begin your research, you’ve got to know what you want to say. Take some time to read the assignment, understand the expectations, and develop an opinion on the subject. This is going to make things a lot easier for you in the long run. Let’s just say your topic is:

“Is climate change real?”

Decide if your answer is yes or no, and begin thinking about your reasons. It sounds obvious, I know, but SOME people have been known to just pick the easiest standpoint to get the assignment done as quickly as possible. Don’t be that person. Think about it!

 

Find Credible Sources For Your Research Paper

Step Two: Find A…Book? At The…Library?

Yes. They exist for a reason. You can find the most credible sources of knowledge in actual books! Imagine that! Decide what your answer is, then take an hour or two to look for a few library books about your subject. Look through them and pay special attention to certain sections that can help support your main point. Then, take them with you and refer back to them as your prime research materials. Looking for a book should always be your first step; they can help you think of more specific things to say, which makes your research more specific as result.

 

Step Three: Find Some Journals

Next, you’ll want to search for some academic journals. In my opinion, some of the best academic journal databases are EBSCOHost, JSTOR, and Google Scholar, but there are so many others, so experiment and find out which one you like best. Your college or university will most likely have a subscription to many of these databases, so go crazy. Remember those specific points you got from those books? You can use those to search for articles devoted to those points!

So if you’re arguing that climate change isn’t real, and changes in sea level is one of your main points, you’ll look for those articles that support both your ideas and those in your books.  As you find more articles that support them, you’ll continue to refine your own argument. Aha! We’re getting more and more precise as we go!

 

Step Four: Yeah Alright, Now You Can Run To The Internet

At this point, you couldn’t get more specific if you tried. Now, it’s all about proving your point. Look for quality sources on the internet. You’ll be looking for quick statistics, helpful numbers, and short quotes that you can sprinkle into your paper.

At this stage, you’d be looking for numbers that reflect changing or consistent sea levels to support your previous research. I know they’re the easiest to find, but internet sources should be the last thing you look at. Anybody can go online and publish anything they want without having it reviewed. Keep an eye out for credible sites—ones where you’ll find articles with a clear author you can cite, and who has cited information themselves. When you leave those sources for the end of your research, you already know what your paper is about, and now it’s just a matter of finding figures and evidence that support all those books and journals!

 

Step Five: Trim The Fat

So now you’ve got bunch of books, academic journals, websites, and a rough draft of your research paper. Great! Now start cutting the stuff you don’t need. A lot of professors give you a minimum of number of sources they want for each medium—2 books, 3 journals, 2 websites, etc. If you’re going for the minimum, then make sure you have the best material you can find! If you’re going for only 2 books, they better give you a TON of information and support every point you make. You should never wonder whether to use a source or not. Make them work for you!

 

 

And that’s it! When you’ve got all your sources ready, make sure you cite them all correctly! If you don’t know how to cite, you can visit the OWL Purdue website to brush up on all the different styles. As I said earlier, if you follow these tips and stay focused, you can have your research done in a day (I’m serious)! Now go! To get more helpful academic tips and homework help, visit StudyGate.com!

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Five Of The Very Best Parts Of Learning Something New

Five Of The Very Best Parts Of Learning Something New

Learning is a lifelong pursuit. We start learning at birth, and it should never, ever stop. Discovering new things in the world can be so exciting when we’re young, but as we grow older, it can be easy to forget that excitement amid all the studying and exams.

Learning can be so much fun! Don’t believe me? Here are five of the best parts of learning something new.

 

Curiosity And Discovery

Have you ever been walking down the street on a rainy day, seen a snail, and wondered if they really melt when you pour salt on them, like on TV? I know you have.

One of the great things about learning is stumbling upon something you don’t understand or have always wondered about. This curiosity has been an integral part of human history, so embrace it! I did, and found a book at the library that explained that when you pour salt on a snail, water is being quickly YANKED out of their body cells through osmosis. The poor snail’s body fights back as it dries out by releasing a slimy substance to protect itself. That weird bubbling comes from that slime and air being forced out of its body as it dies slowly and probably very painfully. Cool!

 

Try It IRL (In Real Life)

It’s always satisfying to learn something in school, then find a way to apply it to your real life. For example, I took French all throughout high school, despite everyone telling me that I’d never have a reason to use it. Then, in one of my college English courses, we were given an assignment to read a book and compare it to the movie adaptation. That made me appreciate the work involved in what would be memorizing dozens of flashcards as an ESL student. Looking over the list, none of the titles interested me…until I found one of my favorite stories, Thérèse Desqueyroux (don’t worry about it)! I read the book, watched the movie (entirely in French with no subtitles, mais oui), and turned in a great project. It felt great to dust off that knowledge and put it to good use!

 

Impress Your Friends!

Maybe you’re playing Trivial Pursuit (people still play that, right?) or some triva board game with your friends at a game night. Your team gets some far-out question like: “Which French sculptor created the Statue of Liberty?”

All your teamma—Yes, again with the French.

All your teammates groan. But you stay calm, cool, and collected, maybe with a little crooked smile on your face. Why? Because you know the answer! One of the best things about learning is—yeah—showing exactly how smart you are. If you’ve got it, show it off! Let ’em know!

Oh, the answer is Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi, by the way. Anyway…

 

Five Of The Very Best Parts Of Learning Something New

Teaching Someone Else

Passing knowledge on to someone else is one of the most humbling things in the world. If you have young relatives, work with kids, or even know someone who also loves to learn, you can share interesting facts and discuss controversial topics with them. They’ll be grateful for the new information, and you’ll feel smarter for having shared it. It’s a win-win!

 

Stand And Admire

Do you ever look through your old tests and essays from school and think, “Wow, I did that?” Chances are, you did something worth being proud of in the past, and it’s always great to look back and see how good you were! I recently found an old college essay that was so good that my professor thought it was plagiarized (it wasn’t). That’s skill, baby. Skill.

 

 

One could say that learning is a journey. Travel broadens the mind. You start off in one place, and as you learn, doors begin to open. Then, you get the opportunity to learn even more things and open even more doors! It never ends! This reminds me of a wonderful piece of wisdom handed down to me by the great Dr. Suess. He told me:

“The more you read, the more things you’ll know. The more that you learn, the more places you’ll go.”

 

Smart man. Enough said.

For study tips, homework help, and more quotes from the good doctor, come on over to StudyGate.com!

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Amazing Time Management Tips For Someone Who Just Can’t Get It Together

24 hours. That’s all you get in a single day. You can either waste them, get nothing done, and wonder where the time went, or you can make things easier and use your time wisely. At StudyGate, we’re no strangers to time management. We’ve decided to take a moment to share some techniques that will help you develop amazing time management skills!

 

Make A List

Instead of committing to memory everything you have to do today, why not make a short list? Download a note taking app on your phone like OneNote or Google Keep, or use a simple pen and paper and make a to-do list starting from your most urgent task to your least. This something you should do out of habit every day because as your tasks become organized, so too will your thoughts!

 

Know Your Sweet Spot

When I was in high school, you couldn’t get me to do anything productive until around 6:34 PM (very specific). After that, I could hit the books and study for hours, late into the night! It’s worth finding out what time of day is best for you to get things done. Some people work best in the early morning, while many people consider themselves night owls. Understanding when you’re most productive can help you plan your day more efficiently.

 

Prepare Beforehand

I can’t wake up in the morning.

I mean—I can—but I don’t want to, and it’s a big problem when I’ve got to pack all my meals for the day, choose what I’m going to wear, exercise, and get to work on time. Take some of the pressure off and start preparing the night before! Make your lunch, pack your backpack with everything you need, lay out tomorrow’s outfit in a chair (yes, like you did when you were little), and do as many necessary things as you can. Now, you can focus on more important things, and when it’s time, you can just grab your stuff and go!

 

Dream A Little Dream

Only robots can work straight through the day without stopping. For the rest of us, it’s good to take a minute or two to stare out a window or look around and just think. Rest your eyes and give your brain a chance to pause. Daydreaming can be a welcome break from a steady workflow!

 

Future Sight

At the end of the day, when you’re maxin’ and relaxin’, take a moment to just think about what you’ve got to do tomorrow. Organize your thoughts and think of all the ways you need to prepare. It will put you in the right mindset to take on the next day’s tasks and do what you need to do!

 

 

Try some of these out and see how they feel! To tell you the truth, 24 hours is A LOT of time. When you manage your time well, you feel as though you have more time in the day. You have more time to work, more time to sleep, more time to spend with friends, and more time to do more of what you love. Check out some more helpful advice, study tips, and homework help at StudyGate.com!

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